Private Victor Urbanich

Sepia Sat post, this week time is short to prep, so Im just posting a solo photo I found in Az

has the following information written on the back

Pvt Victor V. Urbanich
819 Chem Co.. A.O
U.T.C. 3rd Reg
Camp Sibert , Ala.

Found this info in soc security index records, not sure if it is the same person but there is not a lot that comes up for this name.

URBANICH, VICTOR 14 Mar 1903 Mar 1981 age 77-78 (Southgate, Wayne, MI)
URBANICH, LOUISE 09 Jun 1910 20 Feb 1990 age 79 (Southgate, Wayne, MI)

About these ads

9 Comments

Filed under Loose Photos

9 responses to “Private Victor Urbanich

  1. He seems old for a private. I think my father probably was stationed at that same camp in Alabama for a while.

  2. I’m guessing that he just looked a little older than he was? I love that background…with a swan, no less.

  3. It’s certainly unusual; a couple in military uniform witha peaceful countryside scene in the background! I bet this photo took pride of place on their dresser.

  4. Quite the happy couple. I wonder if this was a wedding photo?

  5. gluepot

    How incongruous is that swan! That must be WW2-era. I found several references to 819 Chemical Co. in WW2. Camp Sibert appears to have been established in 1942, which gives an earliest date, perhaps.

  6. Karen S.

    He’s got a pretty sneaky smile on his face…hmmm…just what could he be thinking?!

  7. They look an unlikely couple and the background is very odd. I’m sure you must have found the right details though, because it isn’t a common name.

  8. He reminds me of an actor I’ve seen in war films. No a very convincing backdrop.

  9. A fun photo. It has the look of a carnival or boardwalk photographer. Something taken quickly and cheaply.

    Camp Siebert was a short-lived base (1942-45) near Gadsden, Alabama where the army conducted various training exercises for the Chemical Warfare Service such as smoke screen defense, chemical decontamination, chemical depot maintenance, and chemical impregnation of clothing. It was closed in 1946.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s